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 - 911 ANNIVERSARY 'I can still see the smoke. I...
911 ANNIVERSARY 'I can still see the smoke. I can see the people. It doesn't go away. I relive everything that happened that day.' Katie Helton, Shelbyville, college student in Brooklyn on Sept 11, 2001 i p$nnnnn v"'-' v t! . fcr v v ; - c jo- - :v 1MM til ni f - " J iirirn 1 r if-nn mi- 1 til Herald & ReviewPhil Jacobs Deb Zueck, principal of Tower Hill Elementary School, explains the meaning behind the memorial to fallen servicemen, especially for Capt. Jack Punches Jr., who graduated from the school and died during the Pentagon attack on 911. mm By HUEY FREEMAN A H&R Staff Writer lmost everybody remembers where they were when they heard planes had crashed into the World Trade Center. Katie Helton was in a college Spanish class in Brooklyn, just across the East River from lower Manhattan, on 911. "They came in and told us to go back to our dorms. A plane hit the World Trade Center," recalls Helton, 22, who is living at home in Shelbyville after graduating from Long Island University in Brooklyn. After receiving the grim news on that September morning three years ago, Helton called home to tell her family she was fine. Then she heard a second plane hit the other tower. "You could see the buildings from our dorm building," recalled Helton, who had just begun her sophomore year. "When the towers fell, I saw the first one going." . As Americans adjust to the realities of a post-911 nation, several people reflected on how their lives were dramatically affected by the attacks. Helton said whenever she sees articles or news clips about 911, MEMORIES A2 v tl r?L Ac i hVv t.i I : Ground zero memorial set 'fcl - - - Associated Press Volunteers complete the raising of 3,031 American flags for a 911 memorial service Friday at Andrew's Park in Vacaville, Calif. Dozens gathered at the park to help assemble the 'Healing Field,' honoring those who died in the 911 attacks. V Parents, grandparents to read names of trade center victims NEW YORK (AP) Last year, children's voices echoed across ground zero. This year, it is the bereaved parents and grandparents of World Trade Center victims who will read aloud the names of those lost on 911. Three years to the minute that terrorists flew the first plane into the twin towers, a moment of silence will be held at 8:46 a.m. today to begin the ceremony at ground zero. Then, in what has become an anniversary tradition, the names of the 2,749 trade center victims will be recited, with pauses for three more moments of silence at 9:03, 9:59 and 10:29 a.m. to mark when the second plane struck and each tower collapsed. The day of remembrance will end with twin beams of light soaring into the night sky. At the Pentagon, officials will lay a wreath and observe a moment of silence. And in Pennsylvania, bells will toll across the state at the minute the fourth plane went down. Nationwide, communities will observe 911 in their own ways, with services at firehouses, memorial dedications, the tolling of bells and flag ceremonies. In Springfield, Mo., a garden will be dedicated to 911 victims, and in New Mexico, residents plan to gather at an Albuquerque church where two trade center beams are on display. SERVICESA2

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  1. Herald and Review,
  2. 11 Sep 2004, Sat,
  3. Page 1

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